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Types of Mycorrhizae

A description of the different types of Mycorrhizae and their unique benefits for different plant species.



Mycorrhizae are mutualistic symbiotic relationships between fungi and the roots of most plants.


Endomycorrhizae

This type of mycorrhizae forms a symbiotic relationship with the plant roots, with the fungal hyphae penetrating the root cells. Endomycorrhizae are found in most plant species, including angiosperms, gymnosperms, and many bryophytes. They are known to improve plant nutrient uptake, especially phosphorous, and water uptake. Endomycorrhizal fungi are a diverse group of fungi that form symbiotic relationships with the roots of most plants. Some common species of endomycorrhizal fungi include:

  • Glomus sp.

  • Rhizophagus sp.

  • Gigaspora sp.

  • Acaulospora sp.

  • Scleroderma sp.

  • Scutellospora sp.

  • Archaeospora sp.

  • Entrophospora sp.

  • Funneliformis mosseae (formerly Glomus mosseae)

These species of endomycorrhizal fungi are found in different soil and plant environments, and each has unique properties that make them well-suited to different plant species and growing conditions.


Ectomycorrhizae

This type of mycorrhizae forms a symbiotic relationship with the root cells, but the fungal hyphae do not penetrate the root cells. Ectomycorrhizae are typically found in tree species, such as pine, oak, and birch. They are known to provide the plant with nitrogen and other nutrients, and also protect the plant from disease.

Both types of mycorrhizae have unique benefits for different plant species and play a crucial role in maintaining healthy plant growth and productivity.

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